Blog

Uncategorized

Indiana Terrestrial Plant Rule to prohibit sale of invasive plants

A large part of the work of a gardener who chooses to work with native plants involves combating the encroachment of the many invasive species that have been introduced to the environment over the past few centuries. Presently the Natural Resource Commission is adopting a rule that will prohibit and restrict the introduction, sale, distribution and transport of invasive terrestrial plants into Indiana. This is a big step toward keeping our ecosystem as close to its original state as possible and gives the native plants a little leg up in the struggle against these aggressive invading species that tend to take over whole habitats. A list of the 44 prohibited invasive terrestrial plants can be found on the INCR website linked here.

Along with this legislative motion the Indiana Invasive Species Council is pushing to have the Callery pear and it’s approximately 20 cultivars and varieties added to that list. The Callery pear was not expected to be an invasive species but with the introduction of more varieties the trees started to cross pollinate and produce viable seed which has lead to the extensive spread of these species. Bad smelling flowers, messy fruit, and branches prone to breakage all add up to this being a poor choice for Indiana gardeners and homeowners.

The IISC has compiled a list of native Indiana trees that support songbirds, butterflies, and pollinators of all kinds with similar aesthetic value as the Callery pear but without all the mess and headache. Some of these native alternatives include Downy Serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea), Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida), and Green Hawthorn (Crataegus viridis). The IICS website is a treasure trove of information so a trip through there is a must do for a true Indiana gardener.

We here at J. Lynne Associates are thrilled that our Indiana government is taking steps to protect our native plants and wildlife!

Around the Community, In The News

Seeing Beauty in Native Plants – A feature in Senior Life

I love being a steward of nature and consider it my life’s work, … Creating beauty and providing food plus habitat for native insects and birds is wonderful.”

Judith Nastally, Senior Life, April 2017

The April 2017 issue of the Senior Life Newspaper featured an article about Judith covering her start into gardening, her experience in the landscaping industry and some more points on getting to know what she’s all about. Here’s an excerpt from that article!

Being a vital part of the outdoors is what gets Judith Nastally’s pulse racing, especially in the warmer months of the year…

Nastally, who has her own gardening and landscaping business, J. Lynne Associates, is a Carroll High School graduate and possesses an associate degree of science in design from Indiana-Purdue University at Fort Wayne. “

Senior Life, April 2017

Check out the link below to find the April 2017 edition of Senior Life and read the full article about Judith and her work with J. Lynne Associates!

Click Here to read the full article.

My 10 years in the retail nursery business alongside my co-workers also provided me with valuable insight. Also, container gardening with native perennials is new, and we are happy to be leading the trend.”


Senior Life, April 2017
For Homeowners, In The News

2018 Perennial Plant of the Year; Allium ‘Millenium’

At the beginning of each growing season the Perennial Plant Association announces its perennial plant of the year and this year that plant is the Allium ‘Millenium’. This beautiful ornamental  plants is a member of the onion family and they spring up with green foliage in the early part of the year and finish with gorgeous rose-purple spherical blooms at the end of 2-3 foot stalks. The Allium ‘Millenium’ blooms when many other plants start to die back making this a great plant to add to a garden to ensure full season color and appeal.

Photo by Mark McDonough.

 

This cultivar was created by Mark McDonough, a horticultural researcher from Massachusets, through multigenerational breeding involving Allium nutans and A. lusitanicum (formerly Allium senescens ssp montanum). He introduced the Allium ‘Millenium’ in 2000 through Plant Delights Nursery and has received wildly positive reviews in the almost two decades since its introduction. As a hearty and tough plant, the Allium ‘Millenium’ makes a wonderful player in a well balanced ornamental garden or landscaping bed. Contact us and ask about putting this beautiful perennial of the year in your home or business landscape!

Uncategorized

Spring Time Planters

As the season begins to slowly warm and the plants prepare to bloom, we start to see the green earth spring back to life. This beauty happens naturally where the earth has been left to grow. There are many places where people find themselves in modern times that lack a substantial amount of natural growing area. It is up to us to bring the spring greenery to our concrete areas and therefore more beauty into our lives. One of the best ways to increase the amount of native beauty in our modern living spaces is by including planters into the design of these spaces. Planters can be large scale, like the ones we installed here, that decorate the facade of the Three Rivers Food Co-op, Fort Wayne, IN, or they can be smaller to fit beside front doorways. The possibilities of using planters are as vast as the designs of planters themselves.

Our aim of landscaping design is to increase the amount of functional native beauty around us. Using planters can add interest, especially in difficult to grow places. Our team at J. Lynne Associates has the knowledge and experience necessary to design and cultivate planters with the health and sustainability of the plants in mind. Contact us to discuss how planters could be implemented into your landscape and therefore increase your enjoyment in these places.

For Homeowners

“Improvements to your landscapes pay off! The return on investment for landscape upgrades is 109%”

The National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture (NICH) is a group that works to educate the public on the benefits of utilizing horticulture at a greater rate throughout society to increase the overall well-being of individuals and communities alike. They have created a wonderful infographic series called #PlantsDoThat and we found a piece of their latest release that directly addressed utilizing plants in living spaces. We found this information very useful and wanted to share it with all of you. Check out what NICH has to say about horticulture where we live.

A large part of what NICH educates on is the financial and fiscal benefits of increased horticulture. As they stated, well landscaped homes are more valuable and represent a great portion of our personal wealth. Investing in the landscaping of your home increases its value and your personal wealth. Aren’t plants so useful?!

NICH has much more information on there website (click here to check it out) and their #PlantsDoThat series is immensely useful as well. We recommend looking at what they have put together as it is a great resource of plant knowledge for the everyday homeowner.

Around the Community, In The News

Master Gardener Presentation at the Home and Garden Show

Springtime is right around the corner, as is The Fort Wayne Home & Garden Show where our designer and master gardener at J. Lynne, Judith Nastally, will be giving a presentation on several native plants and the historical uses and practices of growing and cultivating these locally growing plants. Judith has an intense passion for native plants and how they provide food and shelter for specialized insect species that keep our local ecosystems happy and healthy.

She will be giving this presentation Friday March 2 2018at 1:00 PM.

Judith has a wealth of knowledge and experience with native plants and this talk is one to attend for anyone interested in local plants, insects, and ecology. She is available to give talks and presentations throughout the community on the historical uses of native plants. If you are interested in hosting Judith for a presentation you can email her at jlynneassociates@gmail.com or click here.

 

Around the Community, Uncategorized

‘Native Friendly Trees, Shrubs & Perennials’ Presentation at Sophia’s Portico

This month Judith will be giving a presentation at Fort Wayne’s Sophia’s Portico on the use of native plants in gardens. This program will briefly touch on the origin of ideas about gardens which come mainly from Europe. You will learn how to help our environment with native plants and will be enticed to plant these wonderfully effective, functional members of our region. Come discover the interactions between plants and insects which hold keys to supporting our pollinators. Fall is a great time to learn how to be apart of this environmentally friendly growing trend.

The presentation costs $15 to attend and will be held on October 17 from 7:00 to 9:00 pm.

For Homeowners

INPAWS Articles & Information

The quest to promote native plants in our area is strongly supported by the Indiana Native Plant & Wildflower Society, INPAWS and they have many helpful resources on their website. They have information on plants native to Indiana, which are the plants we promote in our landscaping projects. If you are interested in “Landscaping with Plants Native to Indiana” check out this PDF brochure from their website. The INPAWS website also houses an extensive library of native plant photos, Landscape Worthy Indiana Natives, which provides examples of what these natives look like in the wild.

For Homeowners

Fertilizing

We fertilize your plants at the time of installation and we recommend you hold off fertilizing until the following year. We do offer an Annual Lanscaping Fertilizing service which you can contact us about if you are interested. The soil in Allen County tends to be made of clay and is therefore more alkaline than acidic. Some plants such as Boxwood, Holly, Dogwood, and Serviceberry benefit from an annual application of a soil acidifier plus iron mixture. Let us know if the leaves of your plants are yellowing as this is often a sign of chlorosis and an application of iron will usually improve this condition. There are other causes of yellowing leaves as well.