Around the Community, In The News, Info for Homeowners

Springtime is right around the corner, as is The Fort Wayne Home & Garden Show where our designer and master gardener at J. Lynne, Judith Nastally, will be giving a presentation on several native plants and the historical uses and practices of growing and cultivating these locally growing plants. Judith has an intense passion for native plants and how they provide food and shelter for specialized insect species that keep our local ecosystems happy and healthy.

She will be giving this presentation Friday March 2 at 1:00 PM. Judith has a wealth of knowledge and experience with native plants and this talk is one to attend for anyone interested in local plants, insects, and ecology.

Around the Community, Uncategorized

‘Native Friendly Trees, Shrubs & Perennials’ Presentation at Sophia’s Portico

This month Judith will be giving a presentation at Fort Wayne’s Sophia’s Portico on the use of native plants in gardens. This program will briefly touch on the origin of ideas about gardens which come mainly from Europe. You will learn how to help our environment with native plants and will be enticed to plant these wonderfully effective, functional members of our region. Come discover the interactions between plants and insects which hold keys to supporting our pollinators. Fall is a great time to learn how to be apart of this environmentally friendly growing trend.

The presentation costs $15 to attend and will be held on October 17 from 7:00 to 9:00 pm.

Info for Homeowners

INPAWS Articles & Information

The quest to propagate the native plants in our area is most strongly perpetuated by the Indiana Native Plant & Wildflower Society (INPAWS) and they have many fantastically helpful pieces on information on their website. They have a nice, long list of the native plants of Indiana which are what we try to mostly work with in our landscaping projects. If you are interested in more native plants of Indiana check out this PDF from their website with the common and Latin names of many popular Indiana natives that are most commonly used in landscaping.

Info for Homeowners


We fertilize your plants at the time of installation and we recommend you hold off fertilizing until the following year. We do offer an Annual Lanscaping Fertilizing service which you can contact us about if you are interested. The soil in Allen County tends to be made of clay and is therefore more alkaline than acidic. Some plants such as Boxwood, Holly, Dogwood, and Serviceberry benefit from an annual application of a soil acidifier plus iron mixture. Let us know if the leaves of your plants are yellowing as this is often a sign of chlorosis and an application of iron will usually improve this condition. There are other causes of yellowing leaves as well.

Info for Homeowners

Watering Maintenance

The most important care to give your newly installed landscape plants is proper watering. Please water your new plants once every 2-3 days for the first month, then at least once a week for the remaining growing season. If you notice the foliage drooping on your plants water immediately, some plants need more water like Daylillies and Hydrangeas. Always water plants at root level rather than on the foliage. Direct your hose or watering wand below the leaves around the base of the plant. Use low water pressure and allow a slow trickle of water about 1/2″ in diameter and use the following guidelines; for watering perennials water about 1 minute, for shrubs water for 1-4 minutes, and for trees water 5-15 minutes. 

The best time to water is in the morning before 8:00 a.m. if possible. Do not water to the point of pooling or run off. Avoid getting water on the leaves to prevent leaf scorching during a sunny day and possible diseases from water logged foliage in the evening. 

Around the Community

Fort Wayne Home & Garden Show Presentation

This Friday Judith will be giving a presentation at the Fort Wayne Home & Garden Show on Container Gardens with Native Plants. She is encouraging everyone to plant native, mostly perennial plants in containers regardless of where they may live. This helps to provide food and habitats for our native pollinators, which are declining. It saves money when you plant once and don’t have to plant annuals. Native plants are very hardy and usually do well with little care except for watering at first to establish a strong root system.

Visit the show and check out this increasingly informative presentation on working with the plants that naturally grow in the area that we live in.

Info for Homeowners, Uncategorized

Tips From Purdue Extension

A great resource we have here in Northeast Indiana is the Purdue Extension office. Below are a few tips from Rosie Lerner’s article Gardeners-Start Your Sprinklers, click to read the full article.

“Most gardeners are accustomed to watering flower beds and vegetable gardens. These plants require approximately 1 to 1.5 inches of water per week to maintain healthy flowers, foliage, roots, and fruits. Watering is most critical at pollination and fruit set time for most vegetable crops. Use a mulch where possible to conserve what moisture there is.

“The best way to apply the water is by thoroughly soaking the soil with water in one application. This deep watering will encourage deeper root growth which in turn will be better able to withstand the drought. Frequent shallow watering encourages shallow roots which are more likely to succumb to heat and drying of the top soil. Sandy soil and containerized plants will need more frequent irrigation.

“Watering of landscape and fruit plants should be aimed at where the roots naturally occur. While these woody plants do have some roots that grow very deep, most of the feeder roots that are responsible for water uptake occur in the top 18 inches of top soil. Most of these feeder roots are concentrated below the dripline of the plant and beyond, not up close to the trunk. Allow water to thoroughly soak the target area.

“The ideal time to water is during the early morning hours, ending by 8:00AM. This makes maximum use of water while allowing foliage to dry,” which helps prevent susceptibility to disease.

These are all good tips and information to take in and keep in mind while you’re tending your plants throughout the growing season.

Around the Community, In The News, Uncategorized

Features in The Waynedale News

The work of J. Lynne Associates has been written about in the Waynedale news not once but twice now! Click on one of the images below to read what others are saying about us. We owe a huge thank you to the Waynedale news for featuring us as well!

Judith with Jane in her front yard planting bed.

Here’s what Judith said about Jane’s project; “It was a wonderful project, creating a beautiful and and sustainable garden for Jane. She encouraged me to install as many native perennials as possible to fit her space, design, and budget. Jane’s quote explains her reason for going native is “I just believe it should be natural. They’re hardy, they’re natural, and I really like the way it turned out.”

About the Prairie Preservation Project Judith says “It was a pleasure working with Eddie and Nan Coble on designing a native plant display perennial garden. We walked and measured the

Judith, Nan, and Eddie in front of the Prairie as it’s being seeded.

property and talked about ways to discourage small animals from eating the new plants. We planned on successive flowering during the season with small grasses adding height and drama. We also included nectar plants to help the bees find food and produce honey.”

Our Work

Planter Gardens

Something that we specialize in is installing potted planters as you can see below. There are photos from residential projects along with pictures of our planters you can find outside the 3 Rivers Co-op, where Judith volunteers as well. Whether you are looking to improve the appearance of your home or business, planters are a good way to do that in areas without traditional planting beds (i.e. patios, parking lots, porches, driveways, and other paved areas).